Socialism and Communism

Socialism and Communism

The roots of Socialism can be traced back to the English Civil War, but it mainly arose from the French Revolution, and later from the ideas of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels who wrote The Communist Manifesto. Like it's counterpart Capitalism, Socialism is a materialist doctrine which focuses on the ownership of wealth and property.

Socialists maintain that it is the "working class" who produce the wealth, and this class should collectively decide how the wealth should be used, and therefore socialists seek "worker control" of all major industries, utilities, transport, health, agriculture, education, the media, and finance. Socialists and Marxists believe in the leveling of society to the lowest common denominator so that all are equal owners, producers and consumers.

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Stalin - The Enduring Legacy
Stalin: The Enduring Legacy, examines the anti-Marxist character of Stalinism, the legitimacy of the Moscow Trials against the ‘Old Bolsheviks’, the origins of the Cold War, the development of Trotskyism as a tool of US foreign policy, the question of Stalin’s murder, and the relevance of Russia to the future of world power politics. ‘Dr. Bolton’s book Stalin: The Enduring Legacy is a major contribution to the proper understanding of Russian, as well as American, politics and society in the twentieth century. It brushes aside the anti-Stalinist biases of the Trotskyist American chroniclers of this historical period to reveal the unquestionable integrity of Stalin as a nationalist leader. At the same time, it highlights the vital differences between the Russian national character rooted in the soil and history of Russia, and its opposite, the rootless Jewish cosmopolitanism that Trotskyist Marxism sought to impose on the Russians – as well as on the rest of the world’. - Dr Alexa
£12.00
The Psychotic Left
Reading The Psychotic Left will be an eye-opener for many. The supposed repressive neuroses of the right pale in comparison with the selfish, vicious paranoia of the left (sometimes assisted by drug use and demonstrable brain damage). How can the right have failed to prevent the growth of socialist states all over the West with policies of filling themselves up with third-world immigrants to make up for their own failure to educate their young to the maximum (according to ability)?   Probably the family-venerating Chinese will sweep all before them as the West collapses under the ridiculous burdens which the psychotics of the left have helped impose. But this book will allow a most enjoyable moment of re-thinking – a new chance to accept what Eysenck first began to explain academically in 1954.   Dr Chris Brand. Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh (1970-1997) One consequence of the triumph of the left is the proliferation of fanciful psychiatric
£14.00
The Soul of Man Under Socialism
Oscar Wilde, better known as a genius of English literature, was also an avid advocate of ‘socialism’ of an ‘individualistic or ‘anarchist’ variety. However Wilde’s socialism, like his literary genius, was highly original. Wilde was neither a socialist nor an anarchist in the conventional sense, still less what has come today to be regarded as ‘socialism’ or ‘anarchism’. Wilde was an aesthete, not an economist. Therefore, the socialism he expounded had as its purpose the elevation of the individual to new heights of creativity and culture, rather than as merely a change of ownership of the machinery of production from ‘bourgeoisie’ to ‘proletariat’. The Marxists and most other socialists offer only a mirror image of capitalism. There is no intention of transcending the capitalist ethic but of merely taking it over in the name of the ‘worker’. Wilde’s socialism sought to get the individual off the economic treadmill, to provide him with the time to stop and appreciate the hig
£8.00